Thursday, May 31, 2012

Military Convey Spotted Gassing Up - See Something, Say Something

This could be something, it could be nothing. So to err on the safe side, I'm taking Uncle Janet's advice that 'If you see something, say something.'

I was on my way to lunch when I saw 6 military vehicles queued in line at the local gas station. This was in Lakewood, Colorado.

2 were painted in woodland camo scheme and the other 4 were in desert tan scheme.

I was unable to see any markings designating if they were Army, or Marines, or anything else.

The soldiers driving were in full ACU's with their helmets on, but that's an Army requirement for the drivers. Was unable to get a picture of them though.

No weapons were seen.

Apologies for the fuzzy pictures. My Smartphone camera sucks.










4 comments:

  1. If they were in ACU they were most likely Army. USMC wears the MARPAT cammo.

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  2. It's an Army convoy. Probably National Guard. The USMC, last I knew, did not use the Stewart and Stevens trucks, using their own 7.5 ton instead.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_of_Medium_Tactical_Vehicles

    OK, I do see bumper codes up on the front of the LMTVs. Those are the tan cab-over 2.5 tons. Basically the new "deuce and a half." They come tan from the factory, mostly. The first couple generations from the factory were woodland camo. These days, not so much.

    My advice would be write down those codes if you see them next time. Being able to read the codes is the difference between knowing it's your local National Guard guys out getting licensed on their new trucks or an out of town unit coming in to declare martial law.

    The 5-ton is one of the old M939s, and those are mostly woodland camo still unless they've been through a rebuild cycle.

    The trail truck is the 5-ton wrecker version of the MTV.

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  3. My guess is that they are National Guard soldiers either going to Annual Training or doing some mandatory miles on the vehicles. We have to run them monthly and put so many miles on them for maintenance purposes. The other possibility is that they were running them to the regional maintenance shop (CSMS) or picking them up from same. Either way, they might have needed the HEMTT wrecker as a chase vehicle to pick up anything that fell off the other trucks. The "code" on the bumper is actually the unit they're from, the company and a vehicle number. It would look something like "1-194" on one side of the bumper and "C 112" on the other.

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