Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Mosby: Combat Mindset and Killer Instinct

Many people in the firearms and prepper-survivalist communities like to ramble about their impressive “combat mindset” and “killer instinct.” People who have repeatedly faced violence successfully, especially those who have done so in a professional capacity, understand that guns and gear are of tertiary importance, at best. Even physical conditioning is secondary to the critical importance of cultivation and continuous development of a proper mental attitude— combat mindset.
 
That mindset is composed of three attributes: an unwavering but well-founded conviction in the effectiveness of your training and ability, an absolute willingness, if not anticipation, to apply that training to kill bad people, and the intestinal fortitude to overcome whatever obstacles arise in order to survive to lay hate and discontent on the enemy.
 

Unwavering by well-founded conviction in your ability demands a “software-centric” approach to your training. It’s not about the guns and gear. Even within the ranks of the most vocal “three-percenters” there exist masses of gun owners who purchase an AR-15 or AK-47 at their local sporting goods store, along with a couple boxes of ammunition, based on the advice of some blog writer they’ve never met. Then, the rifle and the ammunition get tossed in a closet or onto a shelf in their “bunker” basement, to be promptly forgotten.

These people place absolute faith in the weapon, expecting it to solve their potential future problems. The firearm becomes a sort of magical talisman in their imagination. This is the “hardware-centric” approach that is the hallmark of amateurs.
 

The professional recognizes that man is a tool user, and values his tools. Nevertheless, he understands that those tools are inanimate objects. The weapon is only effective in the hands of a trained and aggressive operator. The trained, experienced gunslinger accepts the inarguable logic that training is more important than specific tools. If the only weapon available to the professional is a .22LR zip gun, he’ll use it effectively.  There is no time or space for the sin of mediocrity in the software-centric approach to training. The professional doesn’t go to the local strip mall karate dojo for his combatives training. He doesn’t mistake plinking beer cans in the backyard with a .22LR as combat rifle training.

Read the rest here at Forward Observer Magazine

Then go train. Hard.


1 comment:

  1. Just took a closer look at the pic and noticed something... who's that guy in the background standing up on the wall playing airplane in the middle of a firefight? Was that meant to be an example of lack of killer instinct? :D

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